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Going Blind Premieres at Littleton Regional Hospital

May 11, 2011

"Going Blind" Premieres on May 19, 2011 at Littleton Regional Hospital at 5:30 pm in the H. Taylor Caswell, Jr. Physicians' Conference Center in Conference Rooms 1 & 2 in conjunction with the NH Association for the Blind. Joe Lovett's Highly Anticipated Documentary Brings Worldwide Awareness to Vision Loss and Low Vision Therapy Issues. Going Blind is a unique documentary film that increases public awareness of sight loss and low vision issues profoundly affecting the lives of more and more people and those who love them.

Documentary film director and journalist Joe Lovett has glaucoma, a disease that robs 4.5 million people of their vision worldwide. Over the years, Joe has lost a significant amount of vision and in his concern about how to deal with more vision loss, he has started to talk with people who have already lost theirs; people who have lost their sight through blinding diseases like diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration, others through infection and accidents.

Some of the people he meets on the streets, stopping to ask if they have time to talk. Each one has a fascinating story about dealing with the loss we fear most, the loss of sight. Going Blind interweaves Joe's story, his mission to do what he can to slow down the course of his disease through medication and surgeries, with the stories of others who he looks to for guidance in a darkening world.

Jessica Jones, a neighbor of Joe's, is one of the people participating in the film. They met on the street when Jessica was training her seeing eye dog Chef, a black lab. A young, beautiful and talented artist who had been teaching in the New York City public school system, Jessica was exasperated by the lack of encouragement and opportunities after she had lost her sight to diabetic retinopathy in just 8 months at age 32. During the process of filming Jessica secured a job teaching art at a school in the Bronx for blind children with multiple disabilities.

Another is eleven -year old Emmet Teran. Emmet has low vision from albinism, a condition he inherited from his father who also has to deal with extremely low vision. Emmet works with a comedy troupe after school and uses humor to dismiss some of the hurts a child encounters from his peers.

These compelling individual stories provide the sighted with a glimpse into the world of low vision and blindness. Worldwide, 37,000,000 people have lost their vision. In the United States alone, Lighthouse International reports that 10 million people are legally blind (1.3 million) or visually impaired (8.7 million).

Given our aging population and the increasing prevalence of low vision in our society, it is of paramount importance that we understand sight loss and work towards a better future. Going Blind encourages and inspires people to take action to preserve, prolong, and maximize the precious gift of sight - for themselves, their loved ones, and society.

For additional information, please call the NH Association for the Blind - Mary Chase 224-4039 - Ext.324. To register for the event please call, (603) 444-9355.

Click here for Event Flyer (pdf file)

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